October 17, 2019, 02:05:03 AM

Author Topic: Which novel got you into reading,which author would you like to thank  (Read 13209 times)

Offline Matthew Graybosch

  • Shadow Op
  • ****
  • Posts: 63
  • Total likes: 0
  • Gender: Male
  • "Don't turn your back on the city." --The Protomen
    • View Profile
    • Starbreaker: Science Fantasy by Matthew Graybosch
Re: Which novel got you into reading,which author would you like to thank
« Reply #30 on: February 07, 2014, 03:32:02 PM »
I was ten years old, and started with Michael Moorcock's The Jewel in the Skull and Stephen King's The Eyes of the Dragon.
Matthew Graybosch
"Millions against one is almost a fair fight." --Morgan Stormrider in The Blackened Phoenix

Offline ashdelenn

Which novel got you into reading,which author would you like to thank
« Reply #31 on: February 08, 2014, 01:13:43 AM »
I always enjoyed fantasy books as a child but when I was 11 I started reading Tamora Pierce and Mercedes Lackey and they were the ones who got me into the genre.

Offline mgraves

Which novel got you into reading,which author would you like to thank
« Reply #32 on: February 08, 2014, 10:17:21 PM »
Lloyd Alexander's Prydain series was what got me hooked in the fourth and fifth grade. I raided my school library for similar works and quickly devoured the limited selection they had available (mostly Tolkien, Card and Brooks).  Somehow, I managed to convince my mother to let me join one of those book clubs where you get like 15 books for a penny. I was in heaven. Saberhagen, Moorcock, CS Lewis, Pratchett, Asimov and Zelazny came pouring in, at first en masse and then at the steady rate of two books per month. I didn't tire of the bookclub until my senior year in high school when I found out the guy who wrote my favorite Conan books was coming out with a new series called The Wheel of Time.  As it wasn't going to be available from the bookclub on the release date, I canceled my book club subscription and went to the bookstore. After that I anxiously awaited alternating releases of Jordan, Martin and Brooks until Audible came along. At this point I'm back to the old bookclub days of at least trying almost anything out there.

Okay, that turned into a really long answer. Lloyd Alexander got me started.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Offline David Gullen

Re: Which novel got you into reading,which author would you like to thank
« Reply #33 on: February 09, 2014, 09:35:49 PM »
Ha ! Good question, and I can't remember, there have always been books. Perhaps 'Now We are Six' by AA Milne.

Offline apj868

Re: Which novel got you into reading,which author would you like to thank
« Reply #34 on: February 10, 2014, 05:36:04 AM »
As a child: Rhald Dahl and the Gssoebumps series by RL Stine.

I would then like to not thank my English teachers who turned me off reading fiction by forcing me to read books that I had no interest in and then to make matters worse pull them apart word by word.

Then while I was at Uni I picked up the game Star Wars Knights of the old Republic and instantly fell in love with it. I went on to buy more bioware games such as Jade Empire and the first Mass effect game, which I loved. I then walked past Star Wars Darth Bane Path of Destruction in the shop and noticed the author Drew Karpyshin whose name I recognised as a lead writer of many of the bioware games I loved so much. I picked up the book and never looked back, finished it in a couple of days, quickly had a small library of books to read and I have always had a book on the go ever since.

So yeah I'd like to thank Bioware and in particular Drew Karpyshin.

Offline Nazhuret

Re: Which novel got you into reading,which author would you like to thank
« Reply #35 on: February 13, 2014, 03:13:59 PM »
Treasure Island. A xmas gift when I was but a nipper - Black Spots, treasure maps, pirates, sword fights and all the rest! Many thanks to Robert Louis Stevenson.

Offline JonRock411

Re: Which novel got you into reading,which author would you like to thank
« Reply #36 on: February 13, 2014, 03:41:14 PM »
I believe the first novel to really get me into reading fantasy would be Redwall by Brian Jacques when I was in fifth grade.  Granted at the time, it was just me following everyone else because Redwall was oddly popular in my school.  Apparently Redwall was huge in South Carolina elementary schools circa 2001.    That of course led me to finding other fantasy like the Wizard Of Earthsea and THAT led to me being linked to the first Suvudu Cage Match which introduced me to Jordan, Sanderson, Martin, Rothfuss, etc.    After that, I was hooked. 

Offline Eclipse

  • Warning: this topic has not been posted in for at least 120 days.
  • Dragonrider
  • ***
  • Posts: 4266
  • Total likes: 2132
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: Which novel got you into reading,which author would you like to thank
« Reply #37 on: September 10, 2016, 07:16:25 AM »
Bumped for new members
According to some,* heroic deaths are admirable things

* Generally those who don't have to do it.Politicians and writers spring to mind

Jonathan Stroud:Ptolmy's Gate

Offline The Gem Cutter

  • Captain Analogy
  • Writing Group
  • Khaleesi
  • *
  • Posts: 2960
  • Total likes: 2437
  • Gender: Male
  • We've exhausted all possibilities - time to begin.
    • View Profile
    • The Gem Cutter Tales
Re: Which novel got you into reading,which author would you like to thank
« Reply #38 on: September 10, 2016, 07:26:02 AM »
Why, that would have to be Mr. John Ronald Reuel Tolkien's Hobbit, Lord of the Rings, Silmarillion, and all the other wonderful things he wrote.

I think I am borderline Asberghers Syndrome, and like many people with this blessing, it came with a fixation. For me, it was Middle Earth. Thank goodness it wasn't something else.
The Gem Cutter
"Each time, there is the same problem: do I dare? And then if you do dare, the dangers are there, and the help also, and the fulfillment or the fiasco. There's always the possibility of a fiasco. But there's also the possibility of bliss." - Joseph Campbell

Online Lanko

  • Sherlanko Holmes, Jiin Wei and Writing Contest Regular
  • Writing Group
  • Khaleesi
  • *
  • Posts: 2872
  • Total likes: 1960
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
    • Lanko's Goodreads
Re: Which novel got you into reading,which author would you like to thank
« Reply #39 on: September 10, 2016, 01:44:43 PM »
The first fiction I read was Jurassic Park, by Michael Crichton, anywhere between 8-12 years old, because my father had the hardcover laying around (and I think he never even read it) and what kid would resist that cover with a big dinosaur in it  ::)

There we so many differences from the movie and obviously I didn't understand the more complex philosophies and etc, but the important thing was that I started viewing science as being able to make anything possible, which is the best fertilizer for imagination you can get.
So I guess Michael Crichton gets the "thank you" prize?

But I still didn't read anything else SF/F, it would be many years later until I would get into Bernard Cornwell's The Last Kingdom and The Warlord Chronicles and Stephen King's The Dark Tower.
As I learned English over the years I also read all the Magic: The Gathering novels.

And that was it. It would be a whole decade until I missed those Cornwell days and looked for something somewhat similar and saw that Game of Thronescollector box with Ned Stark sitting on Iron Throne two or three years ago. Proceeded to get mind blown by everything in there. Haven't stopped SF/F since then  ::)

So I guess Michael Crichton, Bernard Cornwell, Stephen King and George R.R. Martin all get the prize for various reasons. And Richard Garfield for creating Magic I guess?

Hm, I need to get back to The Last Kingdom, there were only three books released at the time...
Slow and steady wins the race.

Lanko's Year in Books 2019

Offline JMack

  • Hircum Magna Rex of the Fabled Atku Temple, and writing contest regular
  • Writing Group
  • Ringbearer
  • *****
  • Posts: 6963
  • Total likes: 4738
  • Gender: Male
  • Our daily efforts are love poems to the universe.
    • View Profile
    • Tales of Starlit Lands
Re: Which novel got you into reading,which author would you like to thank
« Reply #40 on: September 10, 2016, 03:04:10 PM »
What author do I have to thank for getting me into reading...

Marguerite Henry, who wrote Mistyof Chincoteague about a wild horse on an island off the U.S. Atlantic coast. Mom read it aloud to us three boys. It was my first experience with "chapter books."

But my first reading obsession would have to be the Oz books by L Frank Baum. Although that was followed by non-SFF books that read and re-read, it was my first obsession and led pretty clearly to Alexander's Prydain and Tolkien's Middle Earth. It also helped that I had an older brother who also loved SFF, though he rarely reads it today. (He loved Harry Potter).

So, thank you Mom, Baum, and brother Tom.  :)
Change, when it comes, will step lightly before it kicks like thunder. (GRMatthews)
You are being naive if you think that any sweet and light theme cannot be strangled and force fed it's own flesh. (Nora)
www.starlit-lands.com

Offline MammaMamae

Re: Which novel got you into reading,which author would you like to thank
« Reply #41 on: September 10, 2016, 09:23:23 PM »

Marguerite Henry, who wrote Mistyof Chincoteague about a wild horse on an island off the U.S. Atlantic coast. Mom read it aloud to us three boys. It was my first experience with "chapter books."


Ohhhh, I grew up on a small Morgan farm and had every Marguerite Henry book EVER. 

I can't remember the author that first got me into reading, though Henry, Dahl, and CS Lewis certainly come to mind as memorable early reading experiences.

But when it comes to specifically fantasy - David Eddings, all the way.  One of my best friends loaned me The Diamond Throne when I was 11 and I literally sat on my tack trunk until way after dark, wrapped in a horse blanket with my poor little mare, Polly, "cooling off" in the cross ties while I finished.  I promptly went to the library the next day to get the sequel.  I burned through everything he wrote that year.

I didn't read Tolkien and Le Guin until I was a little older - they really introduced me into the majesty and beauty that fantasy is capable of.

But boy, David Eddings was so much fun to read.

Offline cupiscent

Re: Which novel got you into reading,which author would you like to thank
« Reply #42 on: September 11, 2016, 03:02:02 AM »
I don't thank the authors, I thank the librarians who put the authors into my young and impressionable hands. ;) (Though, for the record, those authors were Tolkien at about age 11, and Eddings at 13. Tolkien was fun, and prepped the way, but Eddings was my introduction to the idea of a "genre".)

Offline Lady Ty

  • Blessed River Lady and Defender of Baby Dragons
  • Ta'veren
  • **
  • Posts: 3458
  • Total likes: 2919
  • Gender: Female
  • So-Old-That-She-Can-Nearly-Be-Called-Oldest-Ty
    • View Profile
Re: Which novel got you into reading,which author would you like to thank
« Reply #43 on: September 11, 2016, 03:50:05 AM »
Some of my early reading was awful as my beloved, kind, gentle Grandma had some of her old childhood books and let me read them. I think she had forgotten what they were about. 

They were sanctimonious moral tales such as Jake, a lame orphan boy who swept level crossings and died in poverty but was taken to heaven as a reward. Presumably for his humble patience and suitably grateful acceptance of his lowly place in the order of things.  Never forget one where a wicked master threw a kitten into a laundry boiler as a punishment. Wonder what that reminds me of lately?  :'(

I even remember reading this one at some point

Quote
Frederic William Farrar's cautionary tale, Eric, or, Little by Little presents the gradual downfall of the unfortunate English schoolboy, Eric Williams. Despite the novel's apparent place in the school-boy literary canon, Farrar makes no attempt to hide his stern moral message: Eric's good intentions fail as he succumbs to the temptations of schoolboy popularity. Having started on this path, his pride urges him onwards down a path of cheating and drinking. Thus although his best friend, Edwin Russell, and his little brother, Vernon, die pious deaths and use their last breaths hoping that Eric will repent, Eric fails to be saved and eventually runs away to sea. However, unlike the penny dreadful hero Jack Harkaway, Eric is not cut out for adventure upon the high seas, and he ultimately returns home only to die, repenting.

Fortunately I found E E Nesbit of The Railway Children and more, also Enid Blyton with Secret Seven and Famous Five were being written and life lightened up. And a funny little old book called Lamb's Tales from Shakespeare set me well on that path for which I am forever grateful.

As for fantasy Tolkien was the key, quite by accident. I saw someone else reading one on the train to work in London, and it had the old grey cover with the big Sauron Eye and I was fascinated so found it for myself and was sold forever. Much later with my children soaked in Eddings together.

Thinking about Eddings, he really created some outstanding characters.  Silk is still one of my alltime favourites also Salmissra.  Woah, this is turning into happy memories thread. ;D
“This is the problem with even lesser demons. They come to your doorstep in velvet coats and polished shoes. They tip their hats and smile and demonstrate good table manners. They never show you their tails.” 
Leigh Bardugo, The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic

Offline DrNefario

Re: Which novel got you into reading,which author would you like to thank
« Reply #44 on: September 11, 2016, 11:15:28 AM »
I don't really remember. I've always liked to read, as far as I can recall.

Early fantasy books that I guess helped develop my tastes were the Narnia books and the Belgariad, both of which I had a bit of a backlash against as I grew out of them. Narnia for the Christian propaganda, and the Belgariad for its racial stereotyping and fairly mechanical construction (20 pages have passed, we'd better have them attacked again.) None of which bothered me the first time through, and maybe one day I'll take another look and see how they stand up now.