June 01, 2020, 11:58:58 PM

Poll

Pick one

The Prince of Cats by D.E .Olesen
3 (42.9%)
The Golem and the Jinni (The Golem and the Jinni #1) by Helene Wecker
0 (0%)
The Twelve Kings by Bradley P Beaullieu
3 (42.9%)
The Perfect Assassin (The Chronicles of Ghadid #1) by K.A. Doore
1 (14.3%)
The Crescent Moon by Saladin  Ahmed
0 (0%)

Total Members Voted: 7

Author Topic: Voting for the April 2020 bookclub read, Theme:Middle Eastern fantasy  (Read 396 times)

Offline Eclipse

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We will have separate threads for the nominations and the voting poll.

Nominations
There's no limit to the number of books that each person can nominate.
Even members who don't want to participate can nominate books, this way we can get a wider range of ideas of books to read.

For a book to reach the voting stage, it must be seconded by a different member.
However, each person can only second 2 books, to restrict the list for voting. If no books are seconded, then the person in charge of the bookclub will pick five books randomly to be voted on.

Please try to choose books with less than 500 pages, and make sure it's a standalone or the first in a series.

Voting
Only vote in the poll if you are going to join the book club for that month.

If there’s a tie at the end, the person in charge of the bookclub will decide who wins.


Even if you haven't voted for the winning book, I do hope to see you in the book club!
« Last Edit: March 02, 2020, 09:46:54 PM by Eclipse »
According to some,* heroic deaths are admirable things

* Generally those who don't have to do it.Politicians and writers spring to mind

Jonathan Stroud:Ptolmy's Gate

Offline Eclipse

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Re: Voting for the April 2020 bookclub read, Theme:Eastern fantasy
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2020, 05:58:35 PM »
Prince of Cats

    To stay alive, Jawad must succeed where all others have failed: he must catch the Prince of Cats. More legend than man, the Prince is draped in rumours. He can steal the silver teeth from your mouth in the blink of a smile. He is a ghost to walls and vaults, he laughs at locks, and Jawad must capture him before powerful people lose their patience and send the young rogue to the scaffold.

    Ever the opportunist, Jawad begins his hunt while carrying out his own schemes. He pits the factions of the city against each other, lining his own pockets in the process and using the Prince as a scapegoat. This is made easy as nobody knows when or where the Prince will strike, or even why.

    As plots collide, Jawad finds himself pressured from all sides. Aristocrats, cutthroats, and the Prince himself is breathing down his neck. Unless Jawad wants a knife in his back or an appointment with the executioner, he must answer three questions: Who is the Prince of Cats, what is his true purpose, and how can he be stopped?

The Golem and the Jinni

Chava is a golem, a creature made of clay, brought to life by a disgraced rabbi who dabbles in dark Kabbalistic magic, created to be the wife of a man who dies at sea on the voyage from Poland. Chava is unmoored and adrift as the ship arrives in New York harbor in 1899.

Ahmad is a jinni, a being of fire born in the ancient Syrian desert, trapped in an old copper flask, and released in New York City, though still not entirely free.

Ahmad and Chava become unlikely friends and soul mates with a mystical connection. Marvelous and compulsively readable, Helene Wecker's debut novel The Golem and the Jinni weaves strands of Yiddish and Middle Eastern literature, historical fiction and magical fable, into a wondrously inventive and unforgettable tale.

The Twelve Kings

In the cramped west end of Sharakhai, the Amber Jewel of the Desert, Çeda fights in the pits to scrape a living. She, like so many in the city, pray for the downfall of the cruel, immortal Kings of Sharakhai, but she's never obeen able to do anything about it. This all changes when she goes out on the night of Beht Zha'ir, the holy night when all are forbidden from walking the streets. It's the night that the asirim, the powerful yet wretched creatures that protect the Kings from all who would stand against them, wander the city and take tribute. It is then that one of the asirim, a pitiful creature who wears a golden crown, stops Çeda and whispers long forgotten words into her ear. Çeda has heard those words before, in a book left to her by her mother, and it is through that one peculiar link that she begins to find hidden riddles left by her mother.
As Çeda begins to unlock the mysteries of that fateful night, she realizes that the very origin of the asirim and the dark bargain the Kings made with the gods of the desert to secure them may be the very key she needs to throw off the iron grip the Kings have had over Sharakhai. And yet the Kings are no fools-they've ruled the Shangazi for four hundred years for good reason, and they have not been idle. As Çeda digs into their past, and the Kings come closer and closer to unmasking her, Çeda must decide if she's ready to face them once and for all.

The Perfect Assasin

A novice assassin is on the hunt for someone killing their own in K. A. Doore's The Perfect Assassin, a breakout high fantasy beginning the Chronicles of Ghadid series.

Divine justice is written in blood.

Or so Amastan has been taught. As a new assassin in the Basbowen family, he’s already having second thoughts about taking a life. A scarcity of contracts ends up being just what he needs.

Until, unexpectedly, Amastan finds the body of a very important drum chief. Until, impossibly, Basbowen’s finest start showing up dead, with their murderous jaan running wild in the dusty streets of Ghadid. Until, inevitably, Amastan is ordered to solve these murders, before the family gets blamed.

Every life has its price, but when the tables are turned, Amastan must find this perfect assassin or be their next target.

The Crescent Moon

Traditional swords & sorcery fantasy with an authentic middle-eastern spin.

The Crescent Moon Kingdoms, land of djenn and ghuls, holy warriors and heretics, Khalifs and killers, is at boiling point. A power struggle between the iron-fisted Khalif and the mysterious master thief known as the Falcon Prince is reaching its climax. In the midst of this brewing rebellion, a series of brutal supernatural murders strikes at the heart of the Kingdoms. Only a handful of reluctant heroes can learn the truth, and stop the killing.

Doctor Adoulla Makhslood just wants a quiet cup of tea. Three score and more years old, he has grown weary of hunting monsters and saving lives, and is more than ready to retire from his dangerous and demanding vocation. But when an old flame's family is murdered, Adoulla is drawn back to the hunter's path. Raseed bas Raseed, Adoulla's young assistant, a hidebound holy warrior whose prowess is matched only by his piety, is eager to deliver God's justice. Zamia Badawi has been gifted with the near-mythical power of the Lion-Shape, but shunned by her people for daring to take up a man's title. She lives only to avenge her father's death. Until she learns that Adoulla and his allies also hunt her father's killer. Until she meets Raseed.

When they learn that the murders and the Falcon Prince's brewing revolution are connected, the companions must race against time to save the life of a vicious despot. In so doing they discover a plot for the Throne of the Crescent Moon that threatens to turn the city, and the world itself, into a blood-soaked  Ruin.
According to some,* heroic deaths are admirable things

* Generally those who don't have to do it.Politicians and writers spring to mind

Jonathan Stroud:Ptolmy's Gate

Offline Bender

Re: Voting for the April 2020 bookclub read, Theme:Eastern fantasy
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2020, 06:17:01 PM »
This is Middle Eastern fantasy, not Eastern fantasy.  :P
"I shall hunt your firstborn children and laugh with glee as I tell them of your death in terrible detail, with many unpleasant adjectives!" - M-Bot

"Who needs science when you have a dragon?" - Neil DeGrasse Tyson in Sharknado 6

Offline Eclipse

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Re: Voting for the April 2020 bookclub read, Theme:Middle Eastern fantasy
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2020, 06:54:04 PM »
Oh this is exciting , which book is going to win  ;D
According to some,* heroic deaths are admirable things

* Generally those who don't have to do it.Politicians and writers spring to mind

Jonathan Stroud:Ptolmy's Gate

Online Alex Hormann

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Re: Voting for the April 2020 bookclub read, Theme:Middle Eastern fantasy
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2020, 06:57:02 PM »
Twelve Kings is a book that more people need to read. I don't have the time for a reread, but I'm looking forward to the conversation if it wins the vote.
Blog: https://atboundarysedge.com

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Offline Eclipse

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Re: Voting for the April 2020 bookclub read, Theme:Middle Eastern fantasy
« Reply #5 on: March 05, 2020, 06:10:22 PM »
Someone break the tie  ;)

Voting
Only vote in the poll if you are going to join the book club for that month.

If there’s a tie at the end, the person in charge of the bookclub will decide who wins.


Even if you haven't voted for the winning book, I do hope to see you in the book club!

We need the person who voted for The Perfect Assassin to decide between The Prince of Cats and The Twelve Kings
« Last Edit: March 05, 2020, 06:15:44 PM by Eclipse »
According to some,* heroic deaths are admirable things

* Generally those who don't have to do it.Politicians and writers spring to mind

Jonathan Stroud:Ptolmy's Gate

Offline Bender

Re: Voting for the April 2020 bookclub read, Theme:Middle Eastern fantasy
« Reply #6 on: March 05, 2020, 06:13:09 PM »
Honestly, I'm intrigued by both. Will read both in April!  ;D
"I shall hunt your firstborn children and laugh with glee as I tell them of your death in terrible detail, with many unpleasant adjectives!" - M-Bot

"Who needs science when you have a dragon?" - Neil DeGrasse Tyson in Sharknado 6

Offline ScarletBea

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Re: Voting for the April 2020 bookclub read, Theme:Middle Eastern fantasy
« Reply #7 on: March 05, 2020, 07:18:03 PM »
If it helps, both Peat and I read Twelve kings and found it a bit meh...
(I haven't been interested in reading the other books in the series)
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Offline Eclipse

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Re: Voting for the April 2020 bookclub read, Theme:Middle Eastern fantasy
« Reply #8 on: March 23, 2020, 08:18:16 PM »
I’m going for Prince  of Cats for April.
According to some,* heroic deaths are admirable things

* Generally those who don't have to do it.Politicians and writers spring to mind

Jonathan Stroud:Ptolmy's Gate