May 28, 2017, 05:54:35 AM

Author Topic: Sword & Sorcery - Recommendations and Opinions  (Read 24062 times)

Offline ScarletBea

  • Positive Invisible Fighter - and bringer of Cake. 2nd in Command of the Writing Contest
  • Writing Group
  • Big Wee Hag
  • ******
  • Posts: 7498
  • Total likes: 4486
  • Gender: Female
  • Geeky Reading Introvert
    • View Profile
    • LibraryThing profile
Re: Sword & Sorcery - Recommendations and Opinions
« Reply #105 on: November 05, 2015, 10:08:17 PM »
Does anyone know if there's a list for all the books that have been nominated for the Gemmell Awards? Wikipedia only has the past winners and the terrible official website not even those.

Is this what you're looking for?
http://gemmellaward.com/page/nominees-to-date
At home in the Fantasy Faction forum!
"There is no way to kill someone mercifully. (...) They may claim that their victims did not suffer. They lie. All they may truly say is that the victim's suffering was invisible to them." Robin Hobb ("Fool's Assassin")

Offline Yora

Re: Sword & Sorcery - Recommendations and Opinions
« Reply #106 on: November 05, 2015, 10:14:51 PM »
Not pretty and lacking any order, but it should do the job. Thaks.
Spriggan's Den

There is nothing to read!

Offline DrNefario

Re: Sword & Sorcery - Recommendations and Opinions
« Reply #107 on: November 05, 2015, 10:26:51 PM »
https://www.worldswithoutend.com/books_legend_index.asp if you want a pretty version. There's a page for the Morningstar, too.

Offline Yora

Re: Sword & Sorcery - Recommendations and Opinions
« Reply #108 on: November 05, 2015, 10:28:39 PM »
Oh nice. That is exactly what I was hoping for.
Spriggan's Den

There is nothing to read!

Offline ScarletBea

  • Positive Invisible Fighter - and bringer of Cake. 2nd in Command of the Writing Contest
  • Writing Group
  • Big Wee Hag
  • ******
  • Posts: 7498
  • Total likes: 4486
  • Gender: Female
  • Geeky Reading Introvert
    • View Profile
    • LibraryThing profile
Re: Sword & Sorcery - Recommendations and Opinions
« Reply #109 on: November 06, 2015, 10:37:04 AM »
Isn't it funny how brains work differently?
For me, a complete book list sorted alphabetically by author's name works much better than the 'pretty version' that DrNefario gave you, if I was looking for reading suggestions hehe
(I've read only 9%: 34 of 370...)
« Last Edit: November 06, 2015, 10:42:46 AM by ScarletBea »
At home in the Fantasy Faction forum!
"There is no way to kill someone mercifully. (...) They may claim that their victims did not suffer. They lie. All they may truly say is that the victim's suffering was invisible to them." Robin Hobb ("Fool's Assassin")

Offline Yora

Re: Sword & Sorcery - Recommendations and Opinions
« Reply #110 on: November 06, 2015, 11:05:16 AM »
I think mostly a matter of purpose.

I want to use it to go looking for new books that I might want to read. Having a list of the books that made it into the final round seems more likely to get me to find something great quickly than a list of all the books that have ever been suggested for an award. At least for the first run.
Looking up every book on the complete list might take some time...  ;D
Spriggan's Den

There is nothing to read!

Offline Drae

Re: Sword & Sorcery - Recommendations and Opinions
« Reply #111 on: November 13, 2015, 09:10:14 AM »
I read The Copper Promise by Jen Williams last year. It skyrocketed to my favourite book and is definitely a sword and sorcery. This is it on Amazon.

Offline Jmack

  • Hircum Magna Rex of the Fabled Atku Temple, and writing context regular
  • Writing Group
  • Elderling
  • ****
  • Posts: 5682
  • Total likes: 3745
  • Gender: Male
  • ridiculously obscure is my super power.
    • View Profile
Re: Sword & Sorcery - Recommendations and Opinions
« Reply #112 on: November 13, 2015, 11:07:51 AM »
I read The Copper Promise by Jen Williams last year. It skyrocketed to my favourite book and is definitely a sword and sorcery. This is it on Amazon.

Hi, @Drae: CP is a favorite of mine, too.
See this thread: http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/fantasy-book-discussion/love-letter-to-jen-williams-spoiler-free-copper-promise/

And let Jen know what you think!
Change, when it comes, will step lightly before it kicks like thunder. (GRMatthews)
You are being naive if you think that any sweet and light theme cannot be strangled and force fed it's own flesh. (Nora)

Offline Yora

Re: Sword & Sorcery - Recommendations and Opinions
« Reply #113 on: November 16, 2015, 05:00:14 PM »
This looks pretty long. With such a convenient way to access it, I will certainly give it a try soon.

William King's Stealer of Flesh is also online. I thought it was pretty good.
Spriggan's Den

There is nothing to read!

Offline Pwibble

Re: Sword & Sorcery - Recommendations and Opinions
« Reply #114 on: November 16, 2015, 08:52:34 PM »
I enjoyed Duncan Hamilton's Society of the Sword books. Not perhaps everyone's interpretation of Sword and Sorcery in that they aren't D+D quests or anything like that but lots of focus on the swords and fighting but with less sorcery perhaps. Not the most complex challenging stories but I really enjoyed them.

Offline Yora

Re: Sword & Sorcery - Recommendations and Opinions
« Reply #115 on: November 21, 2015, 09:46:55 PM »
I am about a third into Night Winds now and Kane is as amazing as ever. Better than in Bloodstone I would actually say.

It really surprises me that I had never really heard of Wagner until a year ago. I think he has no problem standing right next to Howard, Leiber, and Moorcock, and I think he's actually considerably better than the later two. Maybe he was just writing at the wrong time. Entering the Sword & Sorcery game just a bit too late at the end of its boom, but also much too early before its next resurgence. Or perhaps a bit too slow paced and brainy for the audience of the time, though I did get a similar impression from the few Elric stories I've read.
But I feel like he should be a big name in the genre. Currently he's clearly one of my three favorite writers after Howard and Sapkowski.
Spriggan's Den

There is nothing to read!

Offline Yora

Re: Sword & Sorcery - Recommendations and Opinions
« Reply #116 on: November 24, 2015, 08:04:56 PM »
I've often seen mention of Clarke Ashton Smith as some kind of proto-Sword & Sorcery. But I don't really know anything about his work. Does anyone know what I could read as a good introduction and example?
Spriggan's Den

There is nothing to read!

Offline Yora

Re: Sword & Sorcery - Recommendations and Opinions
« Reply #117 on: November 25, 2015, 11:59:25 PM »
I started reading the Hyperborea stories. There's also Avergoine, which is more conventional medieval, and Zothique, which takes place in the final days of the planet Earth with the last few remnants of humanity awaiting their end. Hyperborea is set on Greenland before the Ice Age.

And the family resemblance to Sword & Sorcery is very clearly visible. Smith wrote the first story just a few months after Howard's first Kull story had been published in the magazine they were both writing for, so he seems to have actually picked up the idea from Howards rather than the other way around. The world is certainly very S&S and the encounters with supernatural things are also very S&S. But the structure of the stories is very different. They are not action packed adventure stories but also not mystery investigations like Lovecraft wrote. They are artistic expressions from an artist who also did a lot of poetry, painting, and sculpting. It's not about the narrative but really all about atmosphere and mood.
And yes, it's true what people say, they are also quite funny. Not as obviously comedic as Leiber's stories, but The Tale of Satampra Zeiros and The Door to Saturn are full of jokes which you probably won't all spot on the first pass. It's not people doing funny things but a certain absurdity in many sentences. The Testament of Athammaus is not a funny story, but that absurdity is still there when you're looking out for it. Things happen that are kind of funny, but only when they don't happen to you. For the protagonist they are ideed horrifying.

The Hyperborea stories are not long and there's only 10 of them, but despite Smith's extensive vocabulary, I've found them very easy to read so far. I recommend taking a look at them. Their influence on Leiber is very noticable and you can also spot the Lovecraft crossovers.
Spriggan's Den

There is nothing to read!

Offline Yora

Re: Sword & Sorcery - Recommendations and Opinions
« Reply #118 on: December 12, 2015, 11:29:49 PM »
I've been reading the three Kull stories that Robert Howard managed to sell and I have to say I can see why they never took off at the time. The Shadow Kingdom is okay, but The Mirrors and Kings of the Night really weren't good. I'll keep reading the other stories that were published decades later, but so far I am not feeling the love. Even the weakest Conan stories easily reach the same level of quality.
Spriggan's Den

There is nothing to read!

Offline Yora

Re: Sword & Sorcery - Recommendations and Opinions
« Reply #119 on: December 20, 2015, 07:56:01 PM »
I finished Night Winds, which I really enjoyed a lot. Even more than the other Kane books I've read this one has very little action and has the strongest horror influences, which is what Wagner at the time used to be best known for. Kane also often plays very minor roles while someone else is really the star of the show. But since Kane is being Kane, having him around or simply knowing that he is going to enter the picture at some point is enough to have him have a major impact on each of them.
Lynortis Reprise is possibly my favorite story out of the book. It's by far the most grim and horrific because there isn't really any supernatural involvement. It's all human made horror. And has one of the nicest and most surprising twists I've yet seen in a book. There are plenty of clues which you might all dismiss, until you suddenly make the connections, remember the things you thought insignificant a few pages back, and then woah!  :D

I also started reading Time of Contempt, the fourth Witcher book. Feels like a very good start.

And something that I noticed, which makes both the Witcher stories but also many Conan tales feel more natural than many other fantasy books, is that almost all minor characters are treated as if they are complete people with their own full backstory. I sometimes see it in Kane stories as well. It's very rarely just an inkeeper, a thug, or a guard, but very often these are people who have names and know the protagonist or are known to him. This creates an impression that all these adventurer and bandit types are living in their own close society where everyone is somehow related or has a history. Maybe not entirely plausible, but within the telling of a story it does often feel very natural.
And it's not a technique that is particularly difficult to use.
Spriggan's Den

There is nothing to read!

 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
0 Replies
794 Views
Last post December 26, 2012, 04:18:50 PM
by Tim Marquitz
1 Replies
813 Views
Last post August 05, 2014, 11:15:09 PM
by sockmerchant
2 Replies
768 Views
Last post December 15, 2014, 03:59:16 PM
by Obadoro
4 Replies
1070 Views
Last post April 04, 2015, 11:04:11 PM
by Yora
31 Replies
5858 Views
Last post March 21, 2016, 10:57:47 AM
by Yora