October 30, 2020, 03:56:12 AM

Author Topic: Superhuman Fantasy  (Read 337 times)

Offline Bender

Superhuman Fantasy
« on: September 22, 2020, 12:35:32 AM »
Think more like The Boys (TV show) rather than Avengers (Movies). The genre is not all about larger than live, holier than thou, good heroes. The books straddle all variations from dark and gritty to villains pov. And some are really well written!

The books really straddle, Fantasy & Sci-Fi though!

Here's some to start you over. I'll post more later.

Vicious (Villains #1)
Vengeful (Villains #2)
- VE Schwab

Two bright college kids crack a theory behind people who are rumoured to have gained superpowers and trying it on themselves with a bloody trail of bodies left behind as a consequence. The characters are few, but well etched. They way author builds the characters as shades of grey which gets even more ambiguous as novel progresses is brilliant.

Writing style is stark and beautiful. There are no flowery descriptions and fancy words, just simple sentences that cut through straight to the heart. The way book is structured in multiple small chapters gives the reads of sense of flipping through cards as the story cuts across characters, locations and timelines. At the end you end up cursing the simplistic beauty of the book and wished the author had written more pages and not leave you wanting for more!

Vengeful is still a good follow through, but not as good as book 1. But they do provide a satisfying completion to the arc.

The Rules of Supervillainy (The Supervillainy Saga, #1)
The Games of Supervillainy (The Supervillainy Saga, #2)
- CT Phipps

I had so much fun and lol moments in this book. It's like a anime book of the genre with heroes and villains who'd have fit in One Punch Man or shows like that. Over the top silly and ridiculously fun to read. Gary gets a super cloak of a dead hero and decides to be a villain, but the he's not really a villain material. He confesses to his wife and gets her support, and then recruits two henchpersons (an ex-girlfriend and a past his prime villain), realizes that even the heroes he'd face are kind of acquaintances leading to immeasurable fun and mayhem.

Forging Hephaestus (Villains' Code #1)
- Drew Hayes

The supervillain version of "training" novel. The setting is more akin to a comic, where we have a Association of Superheroes and Guild of Supervillains in the city. When traitors from both sides orchestrate a open conflict ending the truce, the super [heroes and villains] -in-training are caught in the middle. Well established world, really colorful characters and overall brillaint fun read.

Born (The Dire Saga, #1)
Seed (The Dire Saga, #2)
Time (The Dire Saga, #3)
- Andrew Seiple

Mad Max with superhumans. A bit darker/grittier than the usual books in the genre and quite compelling to read. The book is set in a future world that is a bit dystopian in nature. We have brutal gangs vying for power, superheroes fighting super villains thrown into the mix along with AIs and believe it or not...a bit of Vampires (and Holy Grail references), so it was a totally new and refreshing take on the genre. The books starts off with a action sequence and it pretty much continues with brief interludes (to let readers catch their breath, I presume!). We are left in lurch with a protagonist with memory loss and get to unravel the world with her, which adds lots of suspense and excitement.

Fid's Crusade (The Chronicles of Fid #1)
Behind Distant Stars (The Chronicles of Fid #2)
Starfall (The Chronicles of Fid #3)
- David H Reiss

A book with a lot of heart. Probably one of my favorites in this genre!

It's like reading Iron Man, Despicable Me and The Incredibles all in same book. A brilliant scientist becomes a villain to punish superheroes who misuse their powers. A bad guy who does things for good isn't really new, but when done really well like in this case, it becomes refreshing and absolutely fun!



"I shall hunt your firstborn children and laugh with glee as I tell them of your death in terrible detail, with many unpleasant adjectives!" - M-Bot

"Who needs science when you have a dragon?" - Neil DeGrasse Tyson in Sharknado 6

Online cupiscent

Re: Superhuman Fantasy
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2020, 04:04:12 AM »
Does this need to be real-world / present-day to qualify? I've often felt like Django Wexler's Shadow Campaigns series is a blend of flintlock fantasy and superheroes, inasmuch as the magical powers that characters hold are unique and specific.

Offline S. K. Inkslinger

Re: Superhuman Fantasy
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2020, 05:18:03 AM »
Does this need to be real-world / present-day to qualify? I've often felt like Django Wexler's Shadow Campaigns series is a blend of flintlock fantasy and superheroes, inasmuch as the magical powers that characters hold are unique and specific.

Yes, I think so, otherwise there's people with magical powers in every type of fantasy world anyway. Mainly referring to characters with superpowers seemed to mainly come from American DC/ Marvel comics, where the setting seemed mostly to be in the present day.

I'd also like to suggest the Renegades series by Brandon Sanderson. Now that's definitely in the same vein with The Boys, where a group of rebels/ assassins goes around trying to kill evil superheroes.  ;D

Offline Elfy

  • Writing contest regular
  • Powers That Be
  • Big Wee Hag
  • *
  • Posts: 7430
  • Total likes: 840
  • Gender: Male
    • Purple Dove House
Re: Superhuman Fantasy
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2020, 06:33:59 AM »
Myke Cole’s Shadow Ops books are like this. I’d also throw Austin Grossman’s Soon, I Will Be Invincible in there as well as Peter Clines’ Ex series, take a zombocaypse and add super powers.
I will expand your TBR pile.

http://purpledovehouse.blogspot.com

Online cupiscent

Re: Superhuman Fantasy
« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2020, 07:18:21 AM »
Does this need to be real-world / present-day to qualify? I've often felt like Django Wexler's Shadow Campaigns series is a blend of flintlock fantasy and superheroes, inasmuch as the magical powers that characters hold are unique and specific.

Yes, I think so, otherwise there's people with magical powers in every type of fantasy world anyway.

I feel like there's a difference between the usual fantasy fare of magical powers as product of a system - i.e. multiple people have similar powers from a similar source - and a superhero system, where person X heals fast, and person Y can breathe fire, and person Z can walk through stone and no one has precisely the same thing. Wexler has that secondary system, even if his "cause" for the powers is "demonic possession" and not "genetic mutation".

Offline eclipse

  • Warning: this topic has not been posted in for at least 120 days.
  • Dragonrider
  • ***
  • Posts: 4983
  • Total likes: 2418
  • Gender: Male
Re: Superhuman Fantasy
« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2020, 07:23:04 AM »
West lake soul by Rio Youers

Don’t read Wonder Woman by Leigh Bardugo absolutely garbage. Don’t understand why this author is popular, The films are much better
According to some,* heroic deaths are admirable things

* Generally those who don't have to do it.Politicians and writers spring to mind

Jonathan Stroud:Ptolmy's Gate

Offline Elfy

  • Writing contest regular
  • Powers That Be
  • Big Wee Hag
  • *
  • Posts: 7430
  • Total likes: 840
  • Gender: Male
    • Purple Dove House
Re: Superhuman Fantasy
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2020, 11:04:40 PM »
Marissa Meyer also has a cool series called Renegades about groups of superpowered protagonists.

Online cupiscent

Re: Superhuman Fantasy
« Reply #7 on: September 23, 2020, 04:10:20 AM »
Non-argumentatively, I was catching up on my blog-reading this morning and it sounds like Natalie Zina Walschots' book Hench might be solidly in this zone. Review on tor.com here.

Offline S. K. Inkslinger

Re: Superhuman Fantasy
« Reply #8 on: September 23, 2020, 08:40:01 AM »
Marissa Meyer also has a cool series called Renegades about groups of superpowered protagonists.

Oh yeah I completely forgot to mention that! I loved that series too, it was nice getting the POV from the villain's side of the story for a change.  :D

Offline Elfy

  • Writing contest regular
  • Powers That Be
  • Big Wee Hag
  • *
  • Posts: 7430
  • Total likes: 840
  • Gender: Male
    • Purple Dove House
Re: Superhuman Fantasy
« Reply #9 on: September 24, 2020, 07:09:53 AM »
James Alan Gardner had a lot of fun with this genre and the theories behind it in All Those Explosions Were Someone Else's Fault and They Promised Me the Gun Wasn't Loaded about 4 college aged friends in Canada who accidentally acquire superpowers.