May 22, 2018, 06:34:37 PM

Author Topic: On the way to becoming a new trope/cliche?  (Read 620 times)

Offline The Gem Cutter

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Re: On the way to becoming a new trope/cliche?
« Reply #15 on: March 13, 2018, 02:29:42 AM »
Perhaps I am the only one who sees in any post-apocalyptic real-world setting a "message", a moral statement?
"They should have learned that war is bad." "They were too greedy" "They couldn't control their population" "They exploited the earth to extinction", etc. It bothers me because A) I get it and B) the people who don't, don't read ;D  And the preaching violates one of the several reasons I like fantasy: escapism.
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Offline Elfy

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Re: On the way to becoming a new trope/cliche?
« Reply #16 on: March 13, 2018, 04:51:42 AM »
Yes it is becoming more common, perhaps because the threat of a post apocalyptic world is * still a possibility. If it is used with care it is just one more theme to choose from, only cliche if badly done and or made too obvious.

Sometimes a surprise, at the time Planet of the Apes was an OMG moment for me and completely unexpected. Less likely to happen now because we are more aware of the possibilities while we read.

When it is obvious, as in Mark Lawrence Broken Empire and Red Queen’s War I saw it as an extra dimension to the plot. It was a treasure hunt of sneaky little Easter Eggs trying to work out where and what various parts may have referred to from the old world and disaster sites. So, no surprise but another enjoyable element.

*Both Planet of the Apes and Shannara appeared at the height of the Cold War. That is often forgotten but was was an ever present threat at the time. UK knew they would only have a 'Four Minute Warning' ie time from launch to European target, and US had about 30 minutes. Interesting period writers may find worth checking out.
@Lady_Ty, are you talking about the novel Planet of the Apes, or the filmed version? Pierre Boulle's (the same person who also wrote The Bridge Over the River Kwai) novel is a bit different. It's really good, but has a different ending, which I liked more than the one they used in the film.

Like others have said, the post apocalyptic thing isn't new. I first remember encountering it when reading John Christopher as a teen. 
I will expand your TBR pile.

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Offline Lady Ty

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Re: On the way to becoming a new trope/cliche?
« Reply #17 on: March 13, 2018, 07:15:28 AM »
The original film was my first experience of Planet of the Apes @Elfy. I have never read the novel.

Spoiler for Hiden:
The Statue of Liberty lying awkwardly in the sea was a shocked surprise to me, I never for one minute saw it coming at the time.  But that was about 1969, would not be so naive now. ;D
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Offline Neveesandeh

Re: On the way to becoming a new trope/cliche?
« Reply #18 on: March 13, 2018, 08:09:21 AM »
The previous 'Golden Age' civilisation thing has always urked me a little. It strikes me as inherently conservative. Nostalgia for an imagined past can be quite a harmful thing.

That said, I've used this exact thing myself. I'm thinking of trying to subvert it in a later draft.

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Re: On the way to becoming a new trope/cliche?
« Reply #19 on: March 13, 2018, 07:22:01 PM »
It's one of the things I deliberately set out to avoid. I find it somehow ideologically dubious.
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Offline Elfy

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Re: On the way to becoming a new trope/cliche?
« Reply #20 on: March 13, 2018, 08:36:42 PM »
The original film was my first experience of Planet of the Apes @Elfy. I have never read the novel.

Spoiler for Hiden:
The Statue of Liberty lying awkwardly in the sea was a shocked surprise to me, I never for one minute saw it coming at the time.  But that was about 1969, would not be so naive now. ;D
From memory the book has an even more WTF moment at the end. I certainly never saw it coming.
I will expand your TBR pile.

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Offline Skip

Re: On the way to becoming a new trope/cliche?
« Reply #21 on: March 15, 2018, 02:53:37 AM »
Pierre Boulle was a great writer. His A Garden on the Moon is a chilling consideration of the space race, written prior to the first moon landing.  New and aspiring writers are not the only ones who get lost in the general noise.
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Offline S. K. Inkslinger

Re: On the way to becoming a new trope/cliche?
« Reply #22 on: March 15, 2018, 10:28:35 AM »
The first time I came across this was while reading Prince of Thorns as well. It was well executed in the series, and the unpredictability it lends to Jorg's action is pretty nice.

Personally though, it's not a trope I really enjoyed or would use in any of my writings. I do not read Scifi and Dystopian novels at all (and I meant none at all, they are just so not my interest). So personally, would prefer if my fantasy remains fantasy, even better with its own world with their own unique set of rules and systems (like anything written by Brandon Sanderson, for example).

Anything could be good if it is executed well, though, so that's another story.  8)