September 27, 2020, 12:29:43 PM

Author Topic: Most satisfying character arcs you’ve read?  (Read 5721 times)

Offline Dark Squiggle

Re: Most satisfying character arcs you’ve read?
« Reply #30 on: June 27, 2018, 04:59:52 AM »
The Jean Valjean-Javert duo from Les Miserables.  Their lives both begin with a set path, but both are forced to admit their outlooks are wrong and change, and both choose to leave the world when it no longer needs them.They are nearly identical yet polar opposites. Their lives are just a little out of sync, and that makes all the difference.

Offline S. K. Inkslinger

Re: Most satisfying character arcs you’ve read?
« Reply #31 on: June 27, 2018, 07:38:25 AM »
Sanderson continually impresses me with Dalinar's character arcs. He's fully already fully developed and characterized in his old-age self (present time of the story), and Sanderson managed to even further developed his character by introducing flashback during Dalinar's youthful days in Oathbringer. Lovin' it!  :D

Offline Bender

Re: Most satisfying character arcs you’ve read?
« Reply #32 on: June 28, 2018, 12:08:58 AM »
Sanderson continually impresses me with Dalinar's character arcs. He's fully already fully developed and characterized in his old-age self (present time of the story), and Sanderson managed to even further developed his character by introducing flashback during Dalinar's youthful days in Oathbringer. Lovin' it!  :D

I'll be honest. I thought Dalinar youth was one of the worst arcs in that series. It didn't have the gravitas and paid scant attention to the actual relationship. The love for his wife was portrayed astonishingly badly and left a massive hole to n trying to explain his reaction to the tragedy. I was disappointed.
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Offline Lanko

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Re: Most satisfying character arcs you’ve read?
« Reply #33 on: June 28, 2018, 02:29:02 AM »
The best character arc I didn'r read, but it was Zuko in Avatar. That's one really damn great character that changes so dramatically while simultaneously staying consistent from start to finish. He's so well conflicted that he can jump around between extremes and still remain true to character while doing it.

Imagine that emo guy from the new Star Wars, but done really, really well.  :P

I've been meaning to watch Avatar for a while. So far I've only seen LoK. I know that one's pretty divisive, but overall I really liked it. Especially the third series.

Agreed with Zuko. I don't really do this very often, but the four seasons of Avatar: The Last Airbender were binge-watched, because it was a really good show (though maybe there was a little Deus Ex near the ending).

Legend of Korra... I stopped in the middle of season 2 and haven't touched it since...which was probably two years or more.

I think the big difference is how they've structured the shows. TLA was one big epic story while LOK was segmented. The first season has a guy who wants to rebel against the bender's society because benders had almost all (or all) political power and non-benders none. The villain could remove bending from people and it was pretty frightening while the new Avatar was very inexperienced.

But in about 10 chapters everything gets solved with minimal problems and consequences. And then another arc begins and almost nothing that happened previously matter.

I think that most people expected it to be a little more similar in structure to TLA. I think the best comparison is that imagine TLA is a novel, and then the author releases book two (LOK) as an anthology of short stories.
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Offline Bender

Re: Most satisfying character arcs you’ve read?
« Reply #34 on: June 28, 2018, 03:22:51 AM »
Legend of Korra felt like a teenage show. If you're in highschool you'd enjoy it. TLA was evergreen.
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Offline Neveesandeh

Re: Most satisfying character arcs you’ve read?
« Reply #35 on: June 28, 2018, 07:14:20 AM »
The best character arc I didn'r read, but it was Zuko in Avatar. That's one really damn great character that changes so dramatically while simultaneously staying consistent from start to finish. He's so well conflicted that he can jump around between extremes and still remain true to character while doing it.

Imagine that emo guy from the new Star Wars, but done really, really well.  :P

I've been meaning to watch Avatar for a while. So far I've only seen LoK. I know that one's pretty divisive, but overall I really liked it. Especially the third series.

Agreed with Zuko. I don't really do this very often, but the four seasons of Avatar: The Last Airbender were binge-watched, because it was a really good show (though maybe there was a little Deus Ex near the ending).

Legend of Korra... I stopped in the middle of season 2 and haven't touched it since...which was probably two years or more.

I think the big difference is how they've structured the shows. TLA was one big epic story while LOK was segmented. The first season has a guy who wants to rebel against the bender's society because benders had almost all (or all) political power and non-benders none. The villain could remove bending from people and it was pretty frightening while the new Avatar was very inexperienced.

But in about 10 chapters everything gets solved with minimal problems and consequences. And then another arc begins and almost nothing that happened previously matter.

I think that most people expected it to be a little more similar in structure to TLA. I think the best comparison is that imagine TLA is a novel, and then the author releases book two (LOK) as an anthology of short stories.

I think a lot of people gave up in the middle of season two, probably because it was the weakest in the series. I personally would say that three is the best, followed by either four or one, most likely four, then two. And while three and four do have different antagonists, the events in four are directly caused by those in three.

But for all I enjoyed the series, it does have some flaws. The episode dedicated to a love triangle was painful to watch.

Offline eclipse

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Re: Most satisfying character arcs you’ve read?
« Reply #36 on: June 30, 2018, 09:55:54 PM »
Marron Shed from the Black Company series.
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Offline ScarletBea

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Re: Most satisfying character arcs you’ve read?
« Reply #37 on: July 01, 2018, 09:21:45 AM »
I wonder if we're all thinking about the same thing here (no problem if we aren't).
For me, a "character arc" is when they start as a person type X and end up as type Y, with a good, reasonable, logic and well-developed explanation/plot about the change.

Some of the examples given wouldn't fit for me (for example Jorg), since I don't think they changed enough (not that that is a bad thing, just a different type of plot/book)
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Offline Lanko

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Re: Most satisfying character arcs you’ve read?
« Reply #38 on: July 01, 2018, 06:57:41 PM »
I wonder if we're all thinking about the same thing here (no problem if we aren't).
For me, a "character arc" is when they start as a person type X and end up as type Y, with a good, reasonable, logic and well-developed explanation/plot about the change.

I think this is more of a modern thing, but some of the best arcs and stories of the past were about how the character fails exactly by refusing to change, like Moby Dick or the Epic of Gilgamesh.

I think this kind of character nowadays don't get to be the main character or even have a POV (or I haven't read one so far). Usually they have been "POVless" villains (Regal, Joffrey, etc).

I wonder if Cersei is the current exception. She is full of self-destructiveness and refusal. Despite numerous warnings, signals and events in the story, she refuses to change her ways and see things differently. Quite the contrary, she becomes every more certain of her ways, about Tyrion, about a lot of things, even when they were at her side and were actually pushed to be enemies by her own hand.

Jorg's change isn't as flashy or big but it's pretty noticeable. He could've become like his father, but consciously stray from that path. I think the biggest comparison was when his father didn't even try to avenge his mother despite being king and having an army and later in the series when his grandfather and his small household is being threatened, he travels from Europe to Lybia, alone and on foot, to take satisfactions from the sultan.

I wonder if there are novels like those old examples, when the MC doesn't change (or refuses) and fails. Maybe and probably they can be more easily found on the literary or non-fiction sections.

Or better still, novels where refusing change is the actual correct choice. Change isn't always good. I think the more extreme examples are resistance from governments (1984, historical fiction say about resistance against Nazis and such) but I think those lack the refusal of the individual and personal change and without the absolute certainty that the opposition is evil, like the government of 1984 or Nazis. 
Slow and steady wins the race.

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Offline Elfy

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Re: Most satisfying character arcs you’ve read?
« Reply #39 on: July 01, 2018, 10:42:22 PM »
I wonder if we're all thinking about the same thing here (no problem if we aren't).
For me, a "character arc" is when they start as a person type X and end up as type Y, with a good, reasonable, logic and well-developed explanation/plot about the change.

Some of the examples given wouldn't fit for me (for example Jorg), since I don't think they changed enough (not that that is a bad thing, just a different type of plot/book)
I agree with you, Bea, which is why I threw up Jaime as an example. Another recent one, and it's a TV show, not a book, is Lee Sizemore in Westworld. His transformation from S1 to S2 was quite extraordinary and a good example of how a situation can change a character.
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