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Author Topic: Most difficult to read scene in a Fantasy Novel?  (Read 10623 times)

Offline CaMarshall

Re: Most difficult to read scene in a Fantasy Novel?
« Reply #30 on: August 22, 2012, 02:16:04 PM »
I don't normally get to a point where there is tears in my eyes, only one film ever came close ( million dollar baby ) but there is one or two novels where I actually have. not in fantasy that I can remember.

 The Power of One by Bryce Courtney has a scene where his pet chicken is killed by a fellow school boy. Saddest moment in novel history. I was 11 years old and in the middle of school at the time o.O

AJZaethe

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Re: Most difficult to read scene in a Fantasy Novel?
« Reply #31 on: August 22, 2012, 03:10:54 PM »
The death of Korona, the False Goddess from Scourge, a Magic the Gathering novel.  She was an accidentally created goddess and the incarnation of an entire world's magic.  In her presence, people became drunk with love over her and they killed themselves over her.  Her presence cleansed the area of filth, she eventually became too strong to stay on the world, as rock began to dissolve.  She became death instead of life and all she wanted was to have kin, to find others like her, because she did not know who she was or why she existed and felt alone. 

That was until two beings who had once been the shadows of the great illusionist, Ixidor, Reality Sculptor, came to be her friend.  They were the only ones who did not praise her, who did not become drunk in her presence.  But at the end, when she was too much for the world and became death they used the very weapon she had no power over to kill her.  As she went to kill Khamal, a man she thought a foe, she saw a silver sheet erupt from her middle and fell backwards into the arms of her friends.  She exclaimed that they betrayed her.  They said they didn't and that loved her but had too and cried.  Korona didn't understand and felt that she truly was alone as she died...I never cried so hard over a book. 

I never thought that a sell out novel from the likes of Magic the Gathering would ever call up such emotion. 

Offline Dan D Jones

Re: Most difficult to read scene in a Fantasy Novel?
« Reply #32 on: August 22, 2012, 08:47:57 PM »
Hmm, maybe anything ever written by Cormac McCarthy?

Offline pornokitsch

Re: Most difficult to read scene in a Fantasy Novel?
« Reply #33 on: August 22, 2012, 10:07:43 PM »
There is a section in Guy Gavriel Kay's Summer Tree where one of the main female characters get captured by the evil 'dark lord', and the scene of her torture was very disturbing.

Yeah, that's a rough scene - almost ruined the entire trilogy for me.

I Stephen Donaldson's Lord Foul's Bane has my all-time toughest scene. Just... yeah. We've discussed it in the past on the forum, and I understand conceptually why it is there and what it means for the story/characters/series, but, yikes.

Offline Lionwalker

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Re: Most difficult to read scene in a Fantasy Novel?
« Reply #34 on: August 22, 2012, 10:12:36 PM »
There is a section in Guy Gavriel Kay's Summer Tree where one of the main female characters get captured by the evil 'dark lord', and the scene of her torture was very disturbing.

Yeah, that's a rough scene - almost ruined the entire trilogy for me.

I Stephen Donaldson's Lord Foul's Bane has my all-time toughest scene. Just... yeah. We've discussed it in the past on the forum, and I understand conceptually why it is there and what it means for the story/characters/series, but, yikes.

I'm guessing the scene when Covenant first enters the new world and encounters the girl? I've heard many people didn't read on further than that. Personally I did carry on reading but stopped for other reasons.

This reminds me of another of Donaldson's books. It is not a scene but an ongoing encounter that takes place in his book The Real Story from his Gap sequence where Morn Hyland is taken prisoner by the pirate Angus Thermopylae. Some really twisted stuff there, and the whole series. Donaldson's books are pretty dark, now that I think about it.
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Offline pornokitsch

Re: Most difficult to read scene in a Fantasy Novel?
« Reply #35 on: August 24, 2012, 11:43:30 AM »
I'm guessing the scene when Covenant first enters the new world and encounters the girl? I've heard many people didn't read on further than that. Personally I did carry on reading but stopped for other reasons.

This reminds me of another of Donaldson's books. It is not a scene but an ongoing encounter that takes place in his book The Real Story from his Gap sequence where Morn Hyland is taken prisoner by the pirate Angus Thermopylae. Some really twisted stuff there, and the whole series. Donaldson's books are pretty dark, now that I think about it.

Exactly. And The Real Story is one whole, long twisted scene. And the series never really gets any perkier, does it?

In fairness to Donaldson, I don't think he's grim for grim's sake - I think the messages are about identity and tragedy and loss and authority and all those things. But, sweet jumping jimminy, his stuff is bleak. His Axbrewder series (noir PI novels) are equally dark, but the final volume is all about redemption (which is a pleasant surprise). I also like his Mordant's Need books, but those are pretty grim as well - using epic fantasy to examine insecurity. It kind of hurts.

Offline Lionwalker

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Re: Most difficult to read scene in a Fantasy Novel?
« Reply #36 on: August 24, 2012, 11:48:03 AM »
I'm guessing the scene when Covenant first enters the new world and encounters the girl? I've heard many people didn't read on further than that. Personally I did carry on reading but stopped for other reasons.

This reminds me of another of Donaldson's books. It is not a scene but an ongoing encounter that takes place in his book The Real Story from his Gap sequence where Morn Hyland is taken prisoner by the pirate Angus Thermopylae. Some really twisted stuff there, and the whole series. Donaldson's books are pretty dark, now that I think about it.

Exactly. And The Real Story is one whole, long twisted scene. And the series never really gets any perkier, does it?

In fairness to Donaldson, I don't think he's grim for grim's sake - I think the messages are about identity and tragedy and loss and authority and all those things. But, sweet jumping jimminy, his stuff is bleak. His Axbrewder series (noir PI novels) are equally dark, but the final volume is all about redemption (which is a pleasant surprise). I also like his Mordant's Need books, but those are pretty grim as well - using epic fantasy to examine insecurity. It kind of hurts.

Yeah, and the Gap cycle was all based on the Wagner's the Ring Cycle. And is a brilliant demonstration of the evolution of characters, in that each of the three main characters starts in a particular place (hero, victim, villain) and as the stories go on they shift to become one of the others. So Morn starts as a victim, ends a a hero, Angus, starts as villain ends up as victim, and whats-his-face, starts as hero and ends as villain. But, yeah. Very very dark.
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Offline pornokitsch

Re: Most difficult to read scene in a Fantasy Novel?
« Reply #37 on: August 24, 2012, 01:24:29 PM »
Yeah, and the Gap cycle was all based on the Wagner's the Ring Cycle. And is a brilliant demonstration of the evolution of characters, in that each of the three main characters starts in a particular place (hero, victim, villain) and as the stories go on they shift to become one of the others. So Morn starts as a victim, ends a a hero, Angus, starts as villain ends up as victim, and whats-his-face, starts as hero and ends as villain. But, yeah. Very very dark.

I've been doing my obsessive fan thing, and slowly tracking down the Gap cycle as first editions. Not that I ever intend to read it again, but it was one of those series I figured I'd always want to have. In nice copies. Sometimes I really don't make sense. Even to myself!

Offline Lionwalker

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Re: Most difficult to read scene in a Fantasy Novel?
« Reply #38 on: August 24, 2012, 01:31:44 PM »
Yeah, and the Gap cycle was all based on the Wagner's the Ring Cycle. And is a brilliant demonstration of the evolution of characters, in that each of the three main characters starts in a particular place (hero, victim, villain) and as the stories go on they shift to become one of the others. So Morn starts as a victim, ends a a hero, Angus, starts as villain ends up as victim, and whats-his-face, starts as hero and ends as villain. But, yeah. Very very dark.

I've been doing my obsessive fan thing, and slowly tracking down the Gap cycle as first editions. Not that I ever intend to read it again, but it was one of those series I figured I'd always want to have. In nice copies. Sometimes I really don't make sense. Even to myself!

That's pretty cool. How many have you got so far? I reckon I will read it again at some point, but I can still remember it so clearly. A sign of good writing.
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Offline Dan D Jones

Re: Most difficult to read scene in a Fantasy Novel?
« Reply #39 on: August 24, 2012, 05:47:02 PM »
Exactly. And The Real Story is one whole, long twisted scene. And the series never really gets any perkier, does it?

I've never understood why he gets so much flack for Lena's rape and gets very little for Morn, who is not just physically raped but also mentally subjugated for an extended period.  I don't mean to minimize the horror or pain of an act of physical rape at all, but it seems to me that being implanted with a device that completely controls your body and turns you into someone's literal sex slave would be orders of magnitude more horrible.

In fairness to Donaldson, I don't think he's grim for grim's sake - I think the messages are about identity and tragedy and loss and authority and all those things. But, sweet jumping jimminy, his stuff is bleak. His Axbrewder series (noir PI novels) are equally dark, but the final volume is all about redemption (which is a pleasant surprise). I also like his Mordant's Need books, but those are pretty grim as well - using epic fantasy to examine insecurity. It kind of hurts.

I don't understand why you find the resolution of the Axbrewder series to be a surprise.  Aren't ALL his books about redemption?