September 27, 2020, 08:30:04 PM

Author Topic: Marcus Falco  (Read 1561 times)

Offline ScarletBea

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Re: Marcus Falco
« Reply #15 on: August 26, 2020, 02:04:39 PM »
I've moved your posts to here :)
At home in the Fantasy Faction forum!

I'm "She Who Reigns Over Us All In Crimson Cheer", according to Peat!

Offline Peat

Re: Marcus Falco
« Reply #16 on: August 26, 2020, 07:40:05 PM »
I've read all 20 Marcus books and I'm up to book five on the Flavia Albia Mystery Series.

let's have your rant about Anacrites.

Nice lad, very respectable, Falco would do well to learn from him
This is the blog of Peat - http://peatlong.blogspot.co.uk/

Offline cupiscent

Re: Marcus Falco
« Reply #17 on: August 27, 2020, 12:15:50 AM »
I've read all 20 Marcus books and I'm up to book five on the Flavia Albia Mystery Series.

let's have your rant about Anacrites.

Nice lad, very respectable, Falco would do well to learn from him

LOL.

But my rant about Anacrites goes like this: Falco dislikes him from the get-go... but then again, Falco has a bee in his bonnet about people who are loyal to / work for the Emperor - he always makes sure to distance what he does for the Emperor from what Anacrites does - and he also has attitude about his social rank and sort of looks down on slaves and freedmen.
Spoiler for Book 20 (Nemesis):
I feel that having Anacrites actually being the Big Villain at the end of it all, without examining Falco's biases against him, is just lazy and a missed opportunity to actually interrogate and deconstruct those biases.
Actually, is that a spoiler for anyone who wanders along here not having read all twenty books? I'll snip it!

Anyway, I was really disappointed about that because I felt that otherwise, Davis is a really canny author who'd done great work with the inherent subjectivity of the first-person memoir-style telling she uses. (On which note: I laughed a lot when Albia noted that her father's working life had been so political that he couldn't publish his memoirs for about two thousand years.)

Offline Peat

Re: Marcus Falco
« Reply #18 on: August 27, 2020, 12:51:12 AM »
I've read all 20 Marcus books and I'm up to book five on the Flavia Albia Mystery Series.

let's have your rant about Anacrites.

Nice lad, very respectable, Falco would do well to learn from him

LOL.

But my rant about Anacrites goes like this: Falco dislikes him from the get-go... but then again, Falco has a bee in his bonnet about people who are loyal to / work for the Emperor - he always makes sure to distance what he does for the Emperor from what Anacrites does - and he also has attitude about his social rank and sort of looks down on slaves and freedmen.
Spoiler for Book 20 (Nemesis):
I feel that having Anacrites actually being the Big Villain at the end of it all, without examining Falco's biases against him, is just lazy and a missed opportunity to actually interrogate and deconstruct those biases.
Actually, is that a spoiler for anyone who wanders along here not having read all twenty books? I'll snip it!

Anyway, I was really disappointed about that because I felt that otherwise, Davis is a really canny author who'd done great work with the inherent subjectivity of the first-person memoir-style telling she uses. (On which note: I laughed a lot when Albia noted that her father's working life had been so political that he couldn't publish his memoirs for about two thousand years.)

One of the fascinating things about Ancient Rome is how someone like Falco could both be snobbish and inverse-snobbish about Anacrites - snobbish as freeborn, inverse as less educated and connected.

But, in any case, it's never really occurred to me to question Falco's instant dislike for Anacrites because I found him a bit of a snake from the get-go so it never occurred to me Falco would be wrong. Leaving aside Falco's biases, I think it makes sense he recognises a dangerous backstabbing hypocrite when he sees one, and that's Anacrites all over.

edit: Looking at your review on GR

Spoiler for Hiden:
I think you're being a bit kind to Anacrites' actions in Last Act in Palmyra
« Last Edit: August 27, 2020, 01:06:02 AM by Peat »
This is the blog of Peat - http://peatlong.blogspot.co.uk/

Offline cupiscent

Re: Marcus Falco
« Reply #19 on: August 27, 2020, 05:02:41 AM »
But, in any case, it's never really occurred to me to question Falco's instant dislike for Anacrites because I found him a bit of a snake from the get-go so it never occurred to me Falco would be wrong. Leaving aside Falco's biases, I think it makes sense he recognises a dangerous backstabbing hypocrite when he sees one, and that's Anacrites all over.

edit: Looking at your review on GR

Spoiler for Hiden:
I think you're being a bit kind to Anacrites' actions in Last Act in Palmyra

And you may well be right! I popped back to have a look at my review and the comments as well, and I agree with past-me - because Falco disliked Anacrites so egregiously from the very start, I was disposed to think that the Falco-narration was exaggerating or misrepresenting his actions - I was constantly trying to "look past" the narration to see what might be really happening, which is part of why I was inclined to put a kinder slant on those events.

Amusingly, I feel like the first Flavia Albia story provides a counterpoint!
Spoiler for Ides of April:
Andronicus is immediately sympathetic and ultimately the villain; Albia takes immediately against both Tiberius and Manlius Faustus, and it turns out they're going to be long-term allies.
That is what I always expected to happen with Anacrites, so a good portion of my disappointment is self-inflicted... but I feel that the laws of narrative back me up! Unless the other party is kicking a puppy (literally or metaphorically), immediate dislike shouldn't be borne out! :P

Offline Peat

Re: Marcus Falco
« Reply #20 on: August 27, 2020, 10:19:55 AM »
But, in any case, it's never really occurred to me to question Falco's instant dislike for Anacrites because I found him a bit of a snake from the get-go so it never occurred to me Falco would be wrong. Leaving aside Falco's biases, I think it makes sense he recognises a dangerous backstabbing hypocrite when he sees one, and that's Anacrites all over.

edit: Looking at your review on GR

Spoiler for Hiden:
I think you're being a bit kind to Anacrites' actions in Last Act in Palmyra

And you may well be right! I popped back to have a look at my review and the comments as well, and I agree with past-me - because Falco disliked Anacrites so egregiously from the very start, I was disposed to think that the Falco-narration was exaggerating or misrepresenting his actions - I was constantly trying to "look past" the narration to see what might be really happening, which is part of why I was inclined to put a kinder slant on those events.

Amusingly, I feel like the first Flavia Albia story provides a counterpoint!
Spoiler for Ides of April:
Andronicus is immediately sympathetic and ultimately the villain; Albia takes immediately against both Tiberius and Manlius Faustus, and it turns out they're going to be long-term allies.
That is what I always expected to happen with Anacrites, so a good portion of my disappointment is self-inflicted... but I feel that the laws of narrative back me up! Unless the other party is kicking a puppy (literally or metaphorically), immediate dislike shouldn't be borne out! :P

I guess the books I've read have given me different narrative expectations. Most instant grudges turn out justified - I'm now trying very hard to think of one where that isn't the case.
This is the blog of Peat - http://peatlong.blogspot.co.uk/

Offline cupiscent

Re: Marcus Falco
« Reply #21 on: August 28, 2020, 04:05:13 AM »
I guess the books I've read have given me different narrative expectations. Most instant grudges turn out justified - I'm now trying very hard to think of one where that isn't the case.

Hmm, let's put it like this: I saw Anacrites as Snape, not Voldemort. :D

Offline Peat

Re: Marcus Falco
« Reply #22 on: August 28, 2020, 10:03:30 AM »
I guess the books I've read have given me different narrative expectations. Most instant grudges turn out justified - I'm now trying very hard to think of one where that isn't the case.

Hmm, let's put it like this: I saw Anacrites as Snape, not Voldemort. :D

I like that comparison.

However I would point out that I view Snape as a vindictive, prejudiced bully who abuses his power and responsibilities, and who gets off far too lightly from the fanbase because of a) his one big redemptive moment shaped by (creepy, creepy) romantic love b) his fantastic array of one-liners. I regard B as a very legitimate excuse.

So Anacrites is Snape, only without the wit, and without Rowling deciding to write in a touching narrative of how even vile people can become heroes and how you can't judge a book by it's character after about five books of saying the opposite :P And because I read Falco first, I see an Anacrites and don't expect a bully's defining moment to be anything other than being a bully, and was pleasantly surprised by Snape's semi-redemption.


edit: Doing a twitter poll for this, 10-1 in favour of Become Friends. Which is just weird to me. It sure as hell ain't real life works in my experience!
« Last Edit: August 28, 2020, 06:36:45 PM by Peat »
This is the blog of Peat - http://peatlong.blogspot.co.uk/