February 19, 2020, 07:42:24 PM

Author Topic: Books with MCs that Breaches Social Bounds  (Read 186 times)

Offline S. K. Inkslinger

Books with MCs that Breaches Social Bounds
« on: January 13, 2020, 09:05:34 AM »
Hello, I've recently noticed that I am a fan favorite of books/ films/ medias where the main protagonist "break the social boundaries", as I've heard earlier in some article. It's those MCs who are somewhat villainous in nature, do some morally questionable things, but is still the main characters and likable to some degree. I'm currently looking for books with this type of character as the MC. 

Some examples from books would be Jorg Ancrath from the Broken Empire, Edrin Walker from the Age of Tyranny (mostly in the second book though)
Some examples from films/ series would be Walter What a.k.a. Heisenberg from Breaking Bad, Thomas Shelby from Peaky Blinders, Tylder Durden from Fight Club, Scarface, Joker from the new Joker movie, Jordan Belfort from the Wolf of Wall Street, Barry Seal from American Made.

Offline Elfy

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Re: Books with MCs that Breaches Social Bounds
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2020, 11:06:59 AM »
Hello, I've recently noticed that I am a fan favorite of books/ films/ medias where the main protagonist "break the social boundaries", as I've heard earlier in some article. It's those MCs who are somewhat villainous in nature, do some morally questionable things, but is still the main characters and likable to some degree. I'm currently looking for books with this type of character as the MC. 

Some examples from books would be Jorg Ancrath from the Broken Empire, Edrin Walker from the Age of Tyranny (mostly in the second book though)
Some examples from films/ series would be Walter What a.k.a. Heisenberg from Breaking Bad, Thomas Shelby from Peaky Blinders, Tylder Durden from Fight Club, Scarface, Joker from the new Joker movie, Jordan Belfort from the Wolf of Wall Street, Barry Seal from American Made.
I’ll recommend a TV series based on books, it’s historical and that’s The Last Kingdom, and another historical series with a ‘hero’ whose moral compass is badly skewed, but he somehow winds up rather likeable and the history is extremely well researched (the notes at the make great reading on their own), and that’s The Flashman Papers by George MacDonald Fraser. Also have you made the acquaintance of Locke Lamora?

Offline Eclipse

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Re: Books with MCs that Breaches Social Bounds
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2020, 11:27:41 AM »
Priest of Bones by Peter McLean
According to some,* heroic deaths are admirable things

* Generally those who don't have to do it.Politicians and writers spring to mind

Jonathan Stroud:Ptolmy's Gate

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Re: Books with MCs that Breaches Social Bounds
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2020, 01:39:44 PM »
It is commonly considered to be one of the defining traits of the Sword & Sorcery genre. It starts with Conan, who is a foreign barbarian often ending up in leadership positions in civilized kingdoms. And you have it with Elric, who is an exiled sorcerer king of a dying civilization, Fafhrd and Gray Mouser, who are criminals, and Kane, who is an evil warrior sorcerer. And of course the Witcher, Geralt of Rivia, who is a mutant that was deliberately created to be a monster hunter, and who lives in a world where monsters have become so rare that few people take his kind really seriously anymore.
We are not standing on the shoulders of giants, but on a big tower of other dwarves.

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Offline Lu Kudzoza

Re: Books with MCs that Breaches Social Bounds
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2020, 04:33:11 PM »

I’ll recommend a TV series based on books, it’s historical and that’s The Last Kingdom, and another historical series with a ‘hero’ whose moral compass is badly skewed, but he somehow winds up rather likeable and the history is extremely well researched (the notes at the make great reading on their own), and that’s The Flashman Papers by George MacDonald Fraser. Also have you made the acquaintance of Locke Lamora?

You'll want to read the Saxon Series by Bernard Cornwell before watching the The Last Kingdom as they're the basis for the show. The books are fast paced and easy to read. And as always, the books are better than the show.

Offline S. K. Inkslinger

Re: Books with MCs that Breaches Social Bounds
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2020, 07:34:06 AM »
Thanks guys. I have several read and one unread book of the Saxon chronicles stewing back at home, so I'd probably went back to read it someday.