July 21, 2019, 09:55:03 AM

Author Topic: NinjaRaptor's Art Thread Redux  (Read 21104 times)

Offline NinjaRaptor

NinjaRaptor's Art Thread Redux
« on: February 16, 2016, 06:09:27 PM »
I had an earlier art thread in this forum a few years back under the username Taharqa, but apparently you're discouraged from posting in thread over 120 days old. So instead I'll just create a new thread with updated work.

I'll start with a Youtube video showcasing my best stuff so far:
[youtube]tkZiRmvKydc[/youtube]

Some more recent output:

Narmer the Founding Pharaoh of Egypt


The Emancipator


The Thunder Rolls


Egyptian Valentine

You can find more on my Wordpress blog.
NEW self-published anthology:
Dinosaurs & Dames

Offline NinjaRaptor

Re: NinjaRaptor's Art Thread Redux
« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2016, 11:43:20 PM »

This sketch was inspired by Beyonce's recent "Formation" song which she sang at this year's Super Bowl (the pose is based on her dance in the official video). The song itself is all right, and I actually don't like how the "albino alligator" line sounds like an anti-white slur to me (I hope it's meant to be ironic or non-serious). However, I wanted to express my endorsement for the song's proud and pro-black sentiment by sketching some fan art for it. Happy Black History Month!
NEW self-published anthology:
Dinosaurs & Dames

Offline NinjaRaptor

Re: NinjaRaptor's Art Thread Redux
« Reply #2 on: February 17, 2016, 06:48:19 PM »

This is Ikaba, the young Queen of a jungle kingdom called Mayombi. She has the difficult task of juggling her regal responsibilities with her youthful desire for adventure and need to manage her even more rambunctious younger brother. She follows in the footsteps of her mother Queen Mwala, whom she views as a role model, and wants more than anything to honor her memory.
NEW self-published anthology:
Dinosaurs & Dames

Offline Shay_Fox

  • Builder
  • ******
  • Posts: 111
  • Total likes: 16
  • Gender: Female
  • I am me loving and caring.. I love to making since
    • View Profile
Re: NinjaRaptor's Art Thread Redux
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2016, 09:37:25 PM »
Its a great thread. You know what i love Egyptian arts. I love to read some stories of it. Send some more stories i really like your work you are working.

Offline NinjaRaptor

Re: NinjaRaptor's Art Thread Redux
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2016, 12:14:41 AM »

If the Egyptians were to colonize the late Cretaceous world via some kind of time portal, their settlers might redesign their gods to incorporate the native wildlife. Isis here for example has a Torosaurus helmet and pterosaur wings. Maybe Anubis on the other hand would be part raptor and Sekhmet part tyrannosaur, or something like that.

What can I say, Egyptology and paleontology are two of my dearest loves and I wanted to combine them into one piece for once.


Before there were horses, zebras, or those goddamn ponies, there was Eohippus, or "Dawn Horse". This little critter, who lived around 10 million years after the non-avian dinosaurs became extinct, was for a long time sorted into the genus Hyracotherium as a junior synonym (much as Brontosaurus was sorted into Apatosaurus), but apparently it's classified as a distinct genus again. So just like ol' Brontosaurus, Eohippus is back in the house of scientific nomenclature! The name certainly sounds more poetic to me than Hyracotherium anyway.

As you can guess, my Eohippus's color pattern mixes influences from the modern zebra and a Central African jungle antelope known as the bongo. They were actually found in North America, but I felt an African-influenced color scheme fit their tropical habitat better.


This procession draws from the concept of civilizations evolving through time as presented in "world history" computer games like the Civilization and Empire Earth series. Sometime I'd like to use this as concept art for a game like those, or at least a mod for one of the existing titles out there. I have here a couple of everyday Egyptians as they might have looked in prehistoric times, their "classical" attire from Egyptian civilization's heyday, and then some speculative industrial- and modern-age designs. In Civilization, they'd probably represent the settler or worker units, and in real-time strategy games like Age of Empires they'd be the villagers gathering your resources.

While this was exhausting to put together, I want to do more of these for a few other ancient civilizations (e.g. Babylonians, Romans, or Maya).


Emperor Caligula (12-41), among the most infamous of Roman emperors, is showing a secret soft side by tending the "giant chameleons" in his personal menagerie. The one he's feeding is showing its gratitude with a vibrant color change in its plates.

I actually don't know for sure if any Roman emperors ever kept menageries or zoos, but the Egyptians and Mesopotamians had them thousands of years earlier, so I think it likely the Romans did too. Certainly they were big on displaying exotic wildlife at public arenas (before having them disembowel troublemakers or fight gladiators, of course). As for how Caligula would have access to these particular "chameleons", I'll just say his legions found an anomalous "glitch" in the fabric of the Universe that allowed unparalleled travel throughout space-time.
NEW self-published anthology:
Dinosaurs & Dames

Offline NinjaRaptor

Re: NinjaRaptor's Art Thread Redux
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2016, 05:12:30 AM »

I couldn't let my ZBrush skills rust from prolonged disuse, so here's a simple Stegosaurus I doodled with it. Most of the time this dinosaur is portrayed with alternating rows of plates rather the symmetrical double row I went with, but I recently read somewhere that one species of Stegosaurus (S. ungulatus) actually did have at least one symmetrical pair of plates, so maybe this isn't a real inaccuracy on my part.
NEW self-published anthology:
Dinosaurs & Dames

Online ScarletBea

  • Welcome party and bringer of Cake. 2nd-in-Command of the Writing Contest
  • Powers That Be
  • Big Wee Hag
  • *
  • Posts: 10740
  • Total likes: 6251
  • Gender: Female
  • Geeky Reading Introvert
    • View Profile
    • LibraryThing profile
Re: NinjaRaptor's Art Thread Redux
« Reply #6 on: February 23, 2016, 08:32:07 AM »
All of these are really cool :D
At home in the Fantasy Faction forum!

"Let us think the unthinkable, let us do the undoable. Let us prepare to grapple with the ineffable itself, and see if we may not eff it after all" - Douglas Adams

Offline NinjaRaptor

Re: NinjaRaptor's Art Thread Redux
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2016, 06:29:47 PM »

This is my doodle of a cave bear (Ursus spelaeus) that would have lived in Europe during the ice age until 24,000 years ago. With a mostly but not strictly herbivorous diet, it would have been a contemporary of the woolly mammoth and rhinoceros as well as Neanderthals and Cro-Magnon Homo sapiens (modern humans). Most artists draw the cave bear as basically resembling an overgrown brown "grizzly" bear, but they diverged from the ancestors of brown and polar bears around 1.4 million years ago. So I chose to give my cave bear mostly black fur with some white patches instead of drawing on brown bears. Indeed, most living bear species other than the brown and polar bears have mostly black (or very dark brown) fur, so it wouldn't surprise me if darker fur was the ancestral state for bears (family Ursidae).


Sometime in the near future, Queen Jamba must defend her remote African kingdom from an invasion of US Marines orchestrated by rogue President Clinton Trump. They may have guns, tanks, and choppers, but then she has intimate knowledge of the terrain and a thriving elephant population at her command.

This was designed to look like those pulpy old "Jungle Comics" covers with Tarzan-influenced heroes fighting hostile wildlife and other perils in the African wilds. As worthy of wincing as the unsubtle racism in those comic covers could be, you have to admire the brazen over-the-top spirit of adventure they evoked.

I should emphasize that the scenario illustrated here takes place sometime in the future, so the Marines being rightfully terrorized here aren't necessarily the current generation who might be reading this. I know our armed forces are necessary for national security and am thankful for that, but I chose US Marines as the antagonists because you never see them as the bad guys in movies. Usually it's either Germans, Russians, Islamic terrorists and other Third World troublemakers, or generic criminals. I thought making our own forces the imperialistic antagonists (albeit at the behest of a corrupt President) would be a welcome change of pace.
NEW self-published anthology:
Dinosaurs & Dames

Offline NinjaRaptor

Re: NinjaRaptor's Art Thread Redux
« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2016, 01:13:26 AM »

Now that I've gone back to modeling with ZBrush, I had to do my favorite animal of all time sooner or later. Actually this project got started a few months back, but I kept putting off its completion because I wasn't sure how to do all the teeth. Turned out inserting one tooth (made from a cylinder mesh) and then moving it with the Transpose tool while holding the Ctrl button did the trick of copying it across the mouth just fine.
NEW self-published anthology:
Dinosaurs & Dames

Offline Lady Ty

  • Blessed River Lady and Defender of Baby Dragons
  • Ta'veren
  • **
  • Posts: 3445
  • Total likes: 2900
  • Gender: Female
  • So-Old-That-She-Can-Nearly-Be-Called-Oldest-Ty
    • View Profile
Re: NinjaRaptor's Art Thread Redux
« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2016, 01:29:29 AM »
@NinjaRaptor I am enjoying all your African/Egyptian style art very much, and really liked the idea of Jamba the Elephant Queen. ;D

Just wondered if you could make your pics smaller as they don't fit on my screen in one piece?

The second answer here may help

http://fantasy-faction.com/forum/forum-help/fantasy-faction-forum-faq/

“This is the problem with even lesser demons. They come to your doorstep in velvet coats and polished shoes. They tip their hats and smile and demonstrate good table manners. They never show you their tails.” 
Leigh Bardugo, The Language of Thorns: Midnight Tales and Dangerous Magic

Offline NinjaRaptor

Re: NinjaRaptor's Art Thread Redux
« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2016, 04:05:08 AM »
Let me try that resizing thing out now:



This is my artistic reconstruction of an early Homo sapiens individual named Omo I. This specimen's remains, which have been dated to around 130,000 years ago, were found by Richard Leakey's team near the Omo River in southwestern Ethiopia. They show a mix of anatomically modern and so-called "archaic" features, by Omo I is nonetheless regarded as firmly within the modern human species.

I don't know if the fragmentary skull Leakey et al found was ever sexed, but being the fan of scantily clad tribal chicks that I am, I went for a female portrayal. Nonetheless I can't help but think she came out looking a little "masculine" (maybe it's the jawline). Nonetheless, I still believe there were hot early Homo sapiens out there at this time period.

NEW self-published anthology:
Dinosaurs & Dames

Offline NinjaRaptor

Re: NinjaRaptor's Art Thread Redux
« Reply #11 on: February 27, 2016, 04:01:43 AM »

Queen Nefertari, beloved consort of Pharaoh Ramses II, enjoys her view of the Egyptian Nile that sustains her hubby's empire.

This is actually the third iteration of a "Queen of the Nile" composition I've drawn twice before. Looking at old art has a paradoxical way of both embarrassing yourself and restoring your confidence by showing your improvement.
NEW self-published anthology:
Dinosaurs & Dames

Offline NinjaRaptor

Re: NinjaRaptor's Art Thread Redux
« Reply #12 on: February 28, 2016, 11:26:52 PM »

Takhaet comes from a lineage of professional soldiers who have fought for Egypt since the rise of the New Kingdom, a family inheritance she takes much pride in. She herself has earned many golden fly medallions in honor of her skill and courage in service of Pharaoh Amenhotep III. She credits much of her success, and that of her forebears, to the divine aid of the lion-masked goddess Sekhmet. But when Amenhotep's spoiled and power-hungry son Akhenaten takes the throne, declaring himself the leader of a new religion under his god Aten, Takhaet must defend her family's traditions and her orphaned niece Nebet from the upstart Pharaoh's persecutions.

Takhaet is the heroine of a short story I recently finished titled The Battle Roar of Sekhmet, which is about her struggle to protect her beliefs and her niece. Its first draft is about 3800 words long and is undergoing review as I type this. As for Takhaet's upper garment here, it's supposed to be some kind of linen undershirt. I think undershirts look badass on both men and women, and I didn't want every female character of mine to have a simple brassiere.
NEW self-published anthology:
Dinosaurs & Dames

Offline NinjaRaptor

Re: NinjaRaptor's Art Thread Redux
« Reply #13 on: March 04, 2016, 11:44:17 PM »

This prehistoric chick and her tame raptor have chosen to stand their ground (or rather tree bough) in the face of this territorial Tyrannosaurus rex.

This is the product not only of half a day's hard work at the desktop and tablet, but also playing three hours of Far Cry: Primal. I'm not very far into the game; I've just gone through the "vision quest" level with the shaman Tensay, but so far I love the game's world-building and setting design. On the other hand, I wish the Neanderthals (called "Udam" in the game) would be portrayed as more than one-dimensionally savage man-eaters, and the fact that you actually have to gather resources from the environment in order to build your weapons is a mechanic I am still getting used to. You can scavenge some of those resources from Neanderthals you kill, but damn, I wish you could also take their spears and arrows wholesale to save you some trouble.
NEW self-published anthology:
Dinosaurs & Dames

Offline NinjaRaptor

Re: NinjaRaptor's Art Thread Redux
« Reply #14 on: March 06, 2016, 08:32:26 PM »

This is a quickly doodled portrait of a tribesman from the Mediterranean coast of Libya who would have been contemporaneous with the ancient Egyptian and Kushite civilizations. These people, who presumably spoke Berber languages like those of the North African Maghreb further west, would have started out as nomadic herders, but later in Egyptian history they grew in number and started settling the Nile Delta in large numbers until they even took over the whole country under Shosenq I in 945 BC. Conventionally Egyptians would portray the Libyans as having fair or light brown skin as they would Middle Easterners as seen in their "table of nations" murals.

The grayish-blue eyes I gave this Libyan tribesman do appear occasionally among Maghrebi Berber-speakers, and it's my belief that they and other "Caucasian" characteristics in these people reflect distant European ancestry from the Iberian peninsula (Spain and Portugal, which would have been practically a stone's drop away from the northwestern African coast). Skeletal remains of people living in that area near the end of the last Ice Age (20-10,500 years ago) have yielded Eurasian mtDNA haplogroups, and the tools associated with them additionally resemble those of the Iberian peninsula (hence why the culture is known as Iberomaurusian).

On the other hand, it should be added that after that period, the Sahara would turn to grassy savanna which would have brought these Iberian migrants into contact and intercourse with darker-skinned native Africans who would influence their culture and language. The Berber languages for instance are actually part of a larger linguistic phylum called Afrasan or Afroasiatic which would have originated along the Sudanese/Horn of African coast (most Ethiopian languages as well as ancient Egyptian itself are also classified under Afrasan). Further, according to the skeletal analyses of bio-anthropologist SOY Keita, the people of Northwest Africa during historical antiquity (e.g. ancient Carthaginians) would show a mix of "Caucasian", African (i.e. Egyptian, Kushite, and West African), and intermediate traits which implies a mixed-race population. Ergo, even though my Libyan tribesman has blue eyes and tawny skin, I wanted his facial features to look intermediate between Africans and Mediterranean Europeans to reflect his people's "biracial" heritage.


The European lion (Panthera leo spelaea) was a subspecies of lion that prowled the subcontinent of Europe during the Pleistocene "Ice Age" epoch all the way to the 10th century AD in Transcaucasia. They would have been 8-10% bigger than the surviving African subspecies, but not quite as big as the American lions (Panthera leo atrox). Not only would they have terrorized Neanderthals and Cro-Magnon humans during the ice age, but they would earn prominent places in ancient Greek and Roman mythology; Herakles/Hercules for example slew one tough specimen of these known as the Nemean lion.

Many modern reconstructions draw the European lion, as well as its American cousin, as almost maneless based on certain Paleolithic cave paintings, but then classical Greek artwork shows them as having full manes like the African subspecies, so I prefer to think they did have manes and those cave paintings (possibly produced by female artists themselves) were simply showing lionesses on the hunt rather than the males of the species. Besides, a thick mane would make sense in the cooler European climate.

I was experimenting again with a more painter-like, line-free version of digital art with this piece. I'm still inexperienced with that method, but I like to think I'm getting better at it with practice.
NEW self-published anthology:
Dinosaurs & Dames