August 07, 2020, 07:33:43 PM

Author Topic: The Bear and the Nightingale:The House that was not there-At the End/LAST 20%  (Read 919 times)

Offline eclipse

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Post your thoughts on this chapters here. (Chapter Twenty Three- End)
« Last Edit: December 26, 2019, 11:47:56 AM by Eclipse »
According to some,* heroic deaths are admirable things

* Generally those who don't have to do it.Politicians and writers spring to mind

Jonathan Stroud:Ptolmy's Gate

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Finished it last night. I feel like after roughly the half-way mark, the narrative petered out and all that lovely build-up was slowly squandered. My predictions were pretty much completely off, which is fine, but the things that happened were basically unpredictable -- as in they didn't make sense. The final fight culminated in some sort of Hollywood blockbuster scene, complete with a long conversation in the middle of a fight and people turning up to save the day unexpectedly and without explanation.

Vasya makes a foolish and quite selfish decision to send Frost off just as he's needed the most (from what we've been told, the fate of the world hangs in the balance) -- and she nor anyone else doesn't pay for it in any way.
Instead, she manages to call all the house spirits of the village, even though there was absolutely no setup for that whatsoever. For that to have been believable, I would liked to have seen her going about the village, helping them out, perhaps convincing the children of the village to help their household spirits, or something like that, earlier in the book. But no, they just turn up, because "surprise!" And then her father turns up, because "surprise!", and just saves the day in a way that hasn't really been set up for, either. Bear has been set free through the sacrifice of someone who fears him and sees him, supposedly a super-powerful act. Yet he can be banished again with the sacrifice of a single mortal? And I despise the Hollywoodesque trope of people turning up at just the right time without any warning or explanation.

Then she decides to go off on some adventure riding about on her horse because apparently the dowry gift she refused is still waiting for her, so money won't be a problem? Meh.

Too many questions.

I really loved the setting, the writing, and the setup. But in the last quarter or so I feel like it all went up in smoke, which just makes me sad as now I don't even feel like continuing the series.

3/5 stars.
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Offline eclipse

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The Fir groove house is definitely a fairytale house , so you should never eat food in a fairy tale house as I’ve heard you never get back to the real world if you do hehe

That’s a turn up for the books Konstantin finds the truth of the bringer of the storm and yet this holy man still does his bidding.

I didn’t like Vasya summoning the house spirits to her aid in the forest , she was always more demanding then loving, Vasya treated the house Fae  more like servants than as a friends.

I agree with Magnus about her father just turning up as well in the right spot  just because the tree is enchanted.

I still enjoyed the book and will carry on with the trilogy:

According to some,* heroic deaths are admirable things

* Generally those who don't have to do it.Politicians and writers spring to mind

Jonathan Stroud:Ptolmy's Gate

Offline isos81

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I pretty much liked when spirits came. It would have been better if they came withouth Vasya's call. It was like, I helped you and now it's your turn type of investment.

I believe this novel could have been better with some minor touches but it is understandable because it is the writer's first novel.

I liked it overall, 4/5. I'll probably read the rest later in the year.

Thanks to the all participants :)
Kallor shrugged. 'I've walked this land when the T'lan Imass were but children. I've commanded armies a hundred thousand strong. I've spread the fire of my wrath across entire continents, and sat alone upon tall thrones. Do you grasp the meaning of this?'

'Yes' said Caladan Brood. 'You never learn'

Offline eclipse

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Glad you liked the book  Isos 😀 now to get Ryan’s book.
According to some,* heroic deaths are admirable things

* Generally those who don't have to do it.Politicians and writers spring to mind

Jonathan Stroud:Ptolmy's Gate

Offline xiagan

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Yes, the end fight had it's deus ex machina moments but I don't have many problems with it. Would you have liked a chapter from Pyotr's viewpoint to make it less out of the blue? Where he goes to the burnt village and comes back, sees his children missing and goes into the woods? He came in just the right moment, okay, but his appearance was consistent with what was happening.

The house spirits didn't bother me much because we didn't really saw them (and the wood spirits) fight. This would have worked without all those pawns. The rusalka and Dunya would have sufficed in my eyes.

Similar with the bear's banishing. I think this was actually really well done.
This all works with fairy tale logic and not being afraid and sacrificing yourself is about the most valuable thing in many fairy tales. Plus the bear bound himself with his words. He promised Pyotr peace if he gave him Vasya. Pyotr offered his own life instead and threw himself to the bear who battered him aside by instinct, thus sealing the deal - in my eyes - involuntarily. Pyotr used the bear's nature against him and tricked him.

I found it interesting how far Konstantin has fallen and fear we won't have seen the rest of him.

Vasya had to go, this much was clear. That she did it on a magical horse with all the riches she may need to roam the earth is on the one side a happy fairy tale ending and on the other side it's a nice twist on all those fairy tale endings where the princess marries her prince and is "locked away" in his castle forever.
Don't forget that this is the first book in a trilogy and while it may look like a soapy happy ending, we know that it is not one.

5/5 (ignoring some minor points because it's her first book.)
"Sire, I had no need of that hypothesis." (Laplace)

Offline eclipse

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Final thoughts @JMack.

For everyone who has finished the book did you find the bear evil? Or is he more neutral then you think like the rest of the fae.
According to some,* heroic deaths are admirable things

* Generally those who don't have to do it.Politicians and writers spring to mind

Jonathan Stroud:Ptolmy's Gate

Offline isos81

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I think he was neutral evil.
Kallor shrugged. 'I've walked this land when the T'lan Imass were but children. I've commanded armies a hundred thousand strong. I've spread the fire of my wrath across entire continents, and sat alone upon tall thrones. Do you grasp the meaning of this?'

'Yes' said Caladan Brood. 'You never learn'